• English 102

    Posted by Eric Grizzle on 3/25/2021

    Since we're going back to the college portion, updates will no longer be posted here but for students on Google Classroom.

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  • 3/23- Tues/ Weds- DPS, review Emerson and Thoreau, Kahoot

    Posted by Eric Grizzle on 3/23/2021

    3/23-24/2021

    11th Bell Work:   Sticky-faced kids and long lines for broken down rides.  A cobwebbed cabin tucked so far into the trees.  The locker room before the most important game of their lives.  A lone balloon climbing high into the sky.  The walls are covered in time pieces, pieces of time, that chime on the hour—tick tock!—tick tock!

    Student Objective: Students will read, comprehend, and analyze 11th grade American fiction.

    Student Target: Students will continue to deepen their understanding of Transcendentalism—basic beliefs, etc.—in reading selections from Henry David Thoreau.

    Success Criteria:

    • Students will identify style, and metaphorsin Thoreau’s writing, and evaluate the writer’s philosophy.
    • Students will discuss Dead Poets Society
    • Students will review Thoreau and answer questions in class.

     

    Agenda

    • Bell work; think/pair/share
    • Discuss Dead Poets Society
    • Review Thoreau
    • Kahoot to check knowledge

     

     

    Discussions

     

    1. Discuss your overall thoughts and impressions of the film. What did you notice?  If we are studying “style” in Thoreau’s writings, what did you see style-wise with the film?  Themes?

     

     

    1. This is a bildungsroman, a “coming-of-age” film, and presents a sensitive protagonist who looks for answers to his/her questions through life experiences. In what ways did the film seem to speak to you, if at all?  Keating says we must constantly strive to find new ways to look at life.  How well do the characters hold this to be true?  What about yourselves?
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  • 3/18-19- Thur-Fri- Finish DPS

    Posted by Eric Grizzle on 3/18/2021

    3/18-19/2021

    11th Bell Work:   In many ways, Dead Poets Society is about the impact we can have on others, both positive and negative.  Other than your immediate parents, who has had a strong impact on who you are and why?

    Student Objective: Students will read, comprehend, and analyze 11th grade American fiction.

    Student Target: Students will continue to deepen their understanding of Transcendentalism—basic beliefs, etc.—in reading selections from Henry David Thoreau.

    Success Criteria:

    • Students will identify style, and metaphorsin Thoreau’s writing, and evaluate the writer’s philosophy.
    • Students will discuss Dead Poets Society

     

    Agenda

    • Bell work; think/pair/share
    • Finish Dead Poets Society
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  • 3/16-17- Tues-Weds- Day 3 DPS

    Posted by Eric Grizzle on 3/16/2021

    3/16-17/2021

    11th Bell Work:   Some people have a problem with authority. How do you feel about authority?  Are you authoritative?

    Student Objective: Students will read, comprehend, and analyze 11th grade American fiction and nonfiction.

    Student Target: Students will continue to deepen their understanding of Transcendentalism—basic beliefs, etc.—in reading selections from Henry David Thoreau.

    Success Criteria:

    • Students will identify style, and metaphors in Thoreau’s writing, and evaluate the writer’s philosophy.

    Agenda

    • Bell work
    • Watch Dead Poets Society Day 3

     

     

     

    Big Ideas

     

    Style

    Comparing Walden and Civil Disobedience

    Metaphors

    Evaluating the Writer’s Statement of Philosophy

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  • 3/15- Mon- from Civil Disobedience

    Posted by Eric Grizzle on 3/15/2021

    3/15/2021

    11th Bell Work:   We lost an hour over the weekend.  Where does it go?  Imagine if unexpectedly we lost a day.  Write about that.

    Student Objective: Students will read, comprehend, and analyze 11th grade American fiction and nonfiction.

    Student Target: Students will continue to deepen their understanding of Transcendentalism—basic beliefs, etc.—in reading selections from Henry David Thoreau.

    Success Criteria:

    • Students will identify style, and metaphors in Thoreau’s writing, and evaluate the writer’s philosophy.

    Agenda

    • Bell work
    • Read the excerpt from Civil Disobedience and add to your notes.
    • No Meet.
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  • 3/11-12 Thurs/ Fri- Day 2 of DPS

    Posted by Eric Grizzle on 3/11/2021

    3/11-12/2021

    11th Bell Work:   Write about a time someone surprised you with kindness.

    Student Objective: Students will read, comprehend, and analyze 11th grade American fiction and nonfiction.

    Student Target: Students will continue to deepen their understanding of Transcendentalism—basic beliefs, etc.—in reading selections from Henry David Thoreau.

    Success Criteria:

    • Students will identify style, and metaphors in Thoreau’s writing, and evaluate the writer’s philosophy.

    Agenda

    • Bell work
    • Watch Dead Poets Society

     

     

     

    Big Ideas

     

    Style—the manner in which a writer puts his or her thoughts into words.  Thoreau constructs paragraphs that build to a climax.  He also repeats his main ideas to reinforce his message.

     

    Comparing Walden and Civil Disobedience—each is written for a different purpose. 

    One is descriptive and poetic, presenting ideas at an easy pace

    The other is logical, advancing a focused argument.

     

    Metaphors—the comparison of two things without using like or as.

     

    Evaluating the Writer’s Statement of Philosophy—Don’t accept everything you read!

    You should evaluate written statements.  Pay attention to the support a writer uses to back up his or her outlook.  As you read Thoreau, compare his ideas and supporting details with your own.

     

    Read from Walden on 407-415.

    Be sure you’re reading and taking notes on stay home days.

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  • 3/9-10- Tues/ Weds- DPS

    Posted by Eric Grizzle on 3/9/2021

    3/9-10/2021

    11th Bell Work:   Yesterday is not ours to recover, but tomorrow is ours to win or lose.—Lyndon B. Johnson

    Aim above morality. Be not simply good, be good for something.—Henry David Thoreau

    Student Objective: Students will read, comprehend, and analyze 11th grade American fiction and nonfiction.

    Student Target: Students will continue to deepen their understanding of Transcendentalism—basic beliefs, etc.—in reading selections from Henry David Thoreau.

    Success Criteria:

    • Students will identify style, and metaphors in Thoreau’s writing, and evaluate the writer’s philosophy.

    Agenda

    • Bell work
    • Watch Dead Poets Society

     

     

     

    Big Ideas

     

    Style—the manner in which a writer puts his or her thoughts into words.  Thoreau constructs paragraphs that build to a climax.  He also repeats his main ideas to reinforce his message.

     

    Comparing Walden and Civil Disobedience—each is written for a different purpose. 

    One is descriptive and poetic, presenting ideas at an easy pace

    The other is logical, advancing a focused argument.

     

    Metaphors—the comparison of two things without using like or as.

     

    Evaluating the Writer’s Statement of Philosophy—Don’t accept everything you read!

    You should evaluate written statements.  Pay attention to the support a writer uses to back up his or her outlook.  As you read Thoreau, compare his ideas and supporting details with your own.

     

    Read from Walden on 407-415.

    Be sure you’re reading and taking notes on stay home days.

    Comments (-1)
  • 3/8- Mon- Carpe Diem

    Posted by Eric Grizzle on 3/8/2021

    3/8/2021

    11th Bell Work:   What makes you happy?  What does it mean to be alive?  When are you the happiest?

    Student Objective: Students will read, comprehend, and analyze 11th grade American fiction and nonfiction.

    Student Target: Students will continue to deepen their understanding of Transcendentalism—basic beliefs, etc.—in reading selections from Henry David Thoreau.

    Success Criteria:

    • Students will identify style, and metaphors in Thoreau’s writing, and evaluate the writer’s philosophy.

    Agenda—Carpe diem (that means “seize the day”!)

    • Bell work and discussion.
    • Meet in 10
      • Review Thoreau…maybe Emerson?
      • Read over 37 Things People Regret and see if 2-3 of them really speak to you.  Be prepared to discuss.
      • Read To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time on DPS handout
      • Begin reading from Walden. p.407—As you read it, take notes on it to make better sense of the text.  You’ll be turning this in for a grade.

     

     

    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862)

    • What did we learn about Thoreau last Thurs/Fri?

     

     

    Big Ideas

     

    Style—the manner in which a writer puts his or her thoughts into words.  Thoreau constructs paragraphs that build to a climax.  He also repeats his main ideas to reinforce his message.

     

    Comparing Walden and Civil Disobedience—each is written for a different purpose. 

    One is descriptive and poetic, presenting ideas at an easy pace

    The other is logical, advancing a focused argument.

     

    Metaphors—the comparison of two things without using like or as.

     

    Evaluating the Writer’s Statement of Philosophy—Don’t accept everything you read!

    You should evaluate written statements.  Pay attention to the support a writer uses to back up his or her outlook.  As you read Thoreau, compare his ideas and supporting details with your own.

     

    Read from Walden on 407-415.

    As we read and discuss, identify two or three bits of wisdom that mean something to you.  Be prepared to explain why.

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  • 3/4-5 Thurs/ Fri- Review, notes on Thoreau

    Posted by Eric Grizzle on 3/4/2021

    03/4-5/2021

    11th Bell Work:   [picture prompt]

    Student Objective: Students will read, comprehend, and analyze 11th grade American fiction and nonfiction.

    Student Target: Students will review Transcendentalist ideals and Emerson’s works.

    Success Criteria:

    • Students will take notes to analyze Transcendentalist thought in literature.
    • I can read and document, citing textual evidence.

     

    Agenda

    • Bell Work; discuss Ekki Mukk
    • Read Concord Hymn and The Snowstorm
    • Review
    • Notes on Thoreau

     

    Big Ideas

    • Transcendentalism was an intellectual movement founded by___________. Some of the basic ideas about it are:
      • Human senses are limited; they convey knowledge of the physical world, but deeper truths can be grasped only through ____________
      • The observation of nature illuminates the nature of ________
      • God, nature, and humanity are united in a shared universal soul, or ___________.
    • Challenging the Text is to question the author’s assertions and ____________.

     

     

     

     

     

    Ralph Waldo Emerson—Transcendentalism

    3 specific beliefs with this unit

    1. Deeper truths can be grasped through intuition; we feel it but can’t grasp it with the five senses.
    2. The importance of nature; nature illuminates the nature of human beings. In other words, what we feel inside, we can see concrete examples in nature outside of ourselves. 
    3. The interconnectedness of all living things in a universal soul, or Over-Soul.

     

     

    Excerpt from Nature—explains how “we” feel in nature; our emotions are reflected in the physical environment.

    Excerpt from Self-Reliance—belief in ourselves, trust ourselves, by being truthful to ourselves we produce our best work, find spiritual peace, and inspiration for life.

    Concord Hymn—song about a monument, memory and the past; the poem is patriotic but also reflects Transcendentalist beliefs by addressing a “Spirit” who has created the brave heroes who fought for American independence.

    Snowstorm—the poem is intimate and cozy, “magical”, it’s the feeling of the first big snowfall of a season.  The “north wind” is like a spirit—alive—crafting a beautiful snow scene like humans might craft something with their hands—the diction shows this with words like “tile,” “masonry,” “roof,” and “art”.  There is an interconnectedness between the humans inside, the travelers who have to stay in their own homes, and the artistry created by nature.

     

    Other notes

    • In his writings, Emerson suggests that our relationship to nature transcends personal relationships.
      • Social ties are for companionship, physical gain. Plus, we tend to conform to the “herd” without often staying true to ourselves.
      • Our relationship to nature, however, binds us to the spiritual foundation of life. We are alive, here and now, not living in the past and preparing for the future.
    • It seems that our relationship to nature tends to be sublime and “real” rather than the relationship between humans and society.

    Emerson’s writings still indicate a belief in a God who had roles in creating both humans and nature.  He uses religious references such as calling the woods “plantations of God".

     

     

     

    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862)

    • He was eccentric and a rebel, rarely following rules.
    • Independent and strong-willed, but didn’t care about school much.
    • His mother persuaded him to get a formal education so he finished high school and went to Harvard.
    • Non-conformist. When Harvard made everyone wear black coats, he wore a green one.
    • He always questioned rules and authority. His objection to corporal punishment led him to quit his first job as a teacher.
    • In 1841, moved into Ralph Waldo Emerson’s house and became fascinated with Transcendentalist beliefs.
    • He decided to not go back to work as a teacher, and wanted to put into practice Emerson’s beliefs.
    • Lived alone in a cabin he built on Walden Pond, and wrote about his experiences.
    • Walden used the four seasons as a structure for his writings during the year he spent there.
      • Walden is considered the supreme work of Transcendentalist literature.
    • Thoreau died of tuberculosis at the age of 44. Emerson spoke at his funeral.
    • His reputation still grows and he has inspired writers, environmentalists, and social and political leaders.

     

     

    Big Ideas

    Style—the manner in which a writer puts his or her thoughts into words.  Thoreau constructs paragraphs that build to a climax.  He also repeats his main ideas to reinforce his message.

    Comparing Walden and Civil Disobedience—each is written for a different purpose. 

    • One is descriptive and poetic, presenting ideas at an easy pace
    • The other is logical, advancing a focused argument.

     

    Metaphors—the comparison of two things without using like or as.

    Evaluating the Writer’s Statement of Philosophy—Don’t accept everything you read!

                You should evaluate written statements.  Pay attention to the support a writer uses to back up his or her outlook.  As you read Thoreau, compare his ideas and supporting details with your own.

     

    Read from Walden on 407-415.

     

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  • 3/2-3- Tues/Weds- Self Reliance, Transcendentalism

    Posted by Eric Grizzle on 3/2/2021

    03/2-3/2021

    11th Bell Work: Hold fast to dreams/ For when dreams go/ Life is a barren field/ Frozen with snow.—Langston Hughes

    Student Objective: Students will read, comprehend, and analyze 11th grade American fiction and nonfiction.

    Student Target: Students will be able to understand the beginnings of Transcendentalism in America, and discuss the role of the individual.

    Success Criteria:

    • Students will take notes and begin to analyze Transcendentalist thought in literature.
    • I can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone.
    • I can apply basic ideas of Transcendentalism to videos
    • I can cite strong and thorough textual evidence.

     

    Agenda

    • Bell Work
    • Thanatopsis companion poem- questions?
    • Read and annotate Self-reliance
    • Review Transcendentalism: the 10 basic tenets of Transcendentalism
    • Apply basic ideas of Transcendentalism to video- Ekki mukk & discussion
    • Concord Hymn and The Snowstorm

     

    Big Ideas

    • Transcendentalism was an intellectual movement founded by___________. Some of the basic ideas about it are:
      • Human senses are limited; they convey knowledge of the physical world, but deeper truths can be grasped only through ____________
      • The observation of nature illuminates the nature of ________
      • God, nature, and humanity are united in a shared universal soul, or ___________.
    • Challenging the Text is to question the author’s assertions and ____________.

     

    Comments (-1)